A couple weeks ago, we began this series on the 2 problems that prevent websites from producing significant online sales.  We’re first attacking the first website design problem; low traffic and then we’re moving on to the second issue, low conversions.  Last week we went through a brief history of Google and their ranking algorithm.  Today, we’re going to touch on keyword selection and its importance.

Keyword selection is vital because you need to optimize your site for the actual phrases that people are searching for.  If you optimize for a phrase that gets very few searches each month, all of your efforts may be fruitless.  What good would it do to rank #1 for a phrase that no one searches for.  I see that all the time.  People come to us, proud of the fact that they rank #1 for their company name.  Would you rather rank for your company name the type of product you sell?  Would you rather rank well for “The Reader’s Nook” which might get 5 searches a month, or for something like “book stores” which might get 8 million searches a month?  Of course you’re thinking the later would be nice.  But what about relevancy?  If you primarily sell classic used books, ranking well for “book stores” may get tons of people to your site who leave right away because they’re looking for the newest releases.  On the other hand, if you ranked well for something like “used book stores” you might get fewer people to your site but chances are the people that hit your site would be more likely to buy.  Does it really matter if you get 1000 people a day to your site or 10 people a day, if you make 10 sales either way?  Obviously it wouldn’t make any difference.  However, it might be a lot more expensive to drive 1000 people to your site than just 10 highly-targeted people.  That can make a huge difference in your margins.

So when you’re evaluating your keywords, you’ll want to not only look at search volume but also at relevancy.  But it doesn’t stop there, you should also consider whether or not the phrases that you’re considering might have a double meaning.  Take the word “Beetles” for instance.  I bet hundreds of thousands of people are searching for that phrase each month.  But how can you tell how many are looking for the VW Beetle vs. how many are looking for The Beetles vs. how many are looking for the insect.   You can’t tell.  Google gives some great insight into what people are looking for, but they can’t tap into those people’s minds and tell you what their intent was when they made the search.  Google is pretty amazing but they can’t read our minds, yet.  So you have to think about the searcher’s intent.

That’s a quick look at keyword research.  Next week, we’ll look at what you do with your keywords once you select the best ones.  Until then, I hope that helps.

 

A couple weeks ago, we began this series on the 2 problems that prevent websites from producing significant online sales.  We’re first attacking the first problem, low traffic and then we’re moving on to the second issue, low conversions.  Last week we went through a brief history of Google and their ranking algorithm.  Today, we’re going to touch on keyword selection and its importance.

Keyword selection is vital because you need to optimize your site for the actual phrases that people are searching for.  If you optimize for a phrase that gets very few searches each month, all of your efforts may be fruitless.  What good would it do to rank #1 for a phrase that no one searches for.  I see that all the time.  People come to us, proud of the fact that they rank #1 for their company name.  Would you rather rank for your company name the type of product you sell?  Would you rather rank well for “The Reader’s Nook” which might get 5 searches a month, or for something like “book stores” which might get 8 million searches a month?  Of course you’re thinking the later would be nice.  But what about relevancy?  If you primarily sell classic used books, ranking well for “book stores” may get tons of people to your site who leave right away because they’re looking for the newest releases.  On the other hand, if you ranked well for something like “used book stores” you might get fewer people to your site but chances are the people that hit your site would be more likely to buy.  Does it really matter if you get 1000 people a day to your site or 10 people a day, if you make 10 sales either way?  Obviously it wouldn’t make any difference.  However, it might be a lot more expensive to drive 1000 people to your site than just 10 highly-targeted people.  That can make a huge difference in your margins.

So when you’re evaluating your keywords, you’ll want to not only look at search volume but also at relevancy.  But it doesn’t stop there, you should also consider whether or not the phrases that you’re considering might have a double meaning.  Take the word “Beetles” for instance.  I bet hundreds of thousands of people are searching for that phrase each month.  But how can you tell how many are looking for the VW Beetle vs. how many are looking for The Beetles vs. how many are looking for the insect.   You can’t tell.  Google gives some great insight into what people are looking for, but they can’t tap into those people’s minds and tell you what their intent was when they made the search.  Google is pretty amazing but they can’t read our minds, yet.  So you have to think about the searcher’s intent.

That’s a quick look at keyword research.  Next week, we’ll look at what you do with your keywords once you select the best ones.  Until then, I hope that helps.

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